Etiqueta: Learn English

Practice Your English – Missing the Cut

At TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback.

Missing the Cut

Friday is always an interesting day in golf. Who will continue playing on Saturday and finish the tournament? After two days of play, the field is reduced and everyone wants to make it, everybody wants to make the cut.

We as spectators, naturally, look at the cut on Friday. But, what if there were more cuts?

From August 16-19, the Wyndham Championship was played at the Sedgefield Country Club. Not the most interesting of tournaments, but still very important. Find out why, in today’s article I would like to invite you to read and answer questions on.

Reading and Questions

The questions are based on an article in Golf Digest which you can read by clicking here. Here are the questions:

  • Why do the best players tend to stay away from the championship?
  • Why did Hurley need to finish above place 200?
  • What is Sergio Garcia’s private drama?
  • Which “game within the game” does Harris English speak about?
  • What is so important about being better than place 150?

Your Ideas

Now you have read the article, what do you think. Does the game behind the tournament interest you? Would it be interesting to pay attention to it?

Send us an email explaining in about 250 words your ideas on the questions above. Send it to info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject “Practice Your English – Missing the Cut” and we will respond as soon as possible with feedback on your writing.

Answers

  • Players look to get some rest after the summer and before the FedEx Cup Playoff
  • Because he would at least get a place on the web.com tour, now he has nothing.
  • He may lose a Ryder Cup position if he doesn’t play well
  • There is a tournament everybody wants to win, but you also need to play well to stay on the tour
  • If you are above that place, you have conditional PGA tour status for 2019.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “What Makes a Great Golf Course”, please click here.

Practice Your English – What Makes a Great Golf Course

At TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback.

What Makes a Great Golf Course

A few weeks ago, Mark Crossfield published an interesting video that we, at TJ English Golf, like quite a lot. In this video he asks the question, “What makes a great golf course”. So we would like to ask you the same question: In your opinion, what makes a great golf course? So we would like to invite you to watch his video, answer some questions and give us your opinion, in writing.

Listening and Questions

The questions are based on Mark Crossfield’s video that you can find by clicking here. The answers you may find at the bottom of the article.

  • What do all four degree on ?
  • What does Dan (white Titlist hat) think about location?
  • What does Mark (the one holding the camera) say about rewarding courses?

Your Ideas

Now you have watched the video, what do you think. What do you think makes a great golf course. Is it the greens, is it the layout? We’d like to know what you think.

Send us an email explaining in about 250 words your ideas on the questions above. Send it to info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject “Practice Your English – Golf Course” and we will respond as soon as possible with feedback on your writing.

Answers

  • All four agree on greens
  • Dan enjoys great views and relaxing in the evening.
  • He hates courses where good shots are not rewarded.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “The Shot Clock Open”, please click here.

Practice Your English – The New Rules of Golf

aprende ingles jugando al golfAt TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback. The level of this class B2/C1.

The New Golf Rules

Recently The R&A and USGA revealed the new rules that will be implemented starting 1st January 2019. The Spanish Golf Federation has also published their translation of the changes to the rules governing this great sport.

The exercises for today are related with these rules changes.

Reading and Questions

The questions below are based on the article by the Golf Monthly which you may find by clicking here. The answers can be found at the bottom of the article.

  • What has been hanged to knee hight?
  • What is the penalty for hitting the flagstick?
  • How has the grounding rule changed?
  • Which three ideas should improve speed of play?

Your Opinion

There are many different opinions on the changes in the rules of golf. We, at TJ English Golf, are sure you also have your ideas on the topic. Write us your ideas in about 100 words and send them to us at info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject line “Practice your English – The New Rules” and we will respond as soon as possible.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “Golf Etiquette”, please click here.

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our monthly newsletter following this link.

Deberes para navidad

"Aprender ingles" "learn English"

After this week, there will be a break for our English classes for two weeks. TWO WEEKS! That’s a lot of time. Agreed, it’s not the two months we “lose” during summer, yet enough to forget many of the things we’ve learned over the last couple of months, isn’t it? More so if you are not able to attend (not “attend to”) classes on a regular basis. So, what can you do during the holidays? How can you keep up your English?

Your homework for the holidays

During the Christmas vacation, I need you to find one hour per day to just listen to English, without paying attention, later I’ll explain why. So, find the BBC iPlayer, for example, or any other radio station you can find on the internet. This is part of creating an English bubble. Impossible? Keep on reading because I beg to differ (I disagree).

The English bubble

A tip I recently gave in one of my recent videos is to create an English bubble around you. Well, it sounds simple, as much English around you as possible. But how to do this in reality, that’s the more complicated part, isn’t it. I do agree (not “be agree”, “to agree” is a verb), it is. Now, think about the amount of downtime (time doing nothing) you usually have. That is a lot of time you can use to put something on (play music or a recording) in the language you are looking to learn, in our case English.

One quite easy thing you can do is to listen to the radio. But there is a catch (trick), you need to stop paying attention to what you hear. What? Yes! I am serious. Often I hear students complain they don’t understand what is being said. The vocabulary is too complicated, the accents are unfamiliar. “I don’t know what they are saying, I cannot understand what they talk about!” Let me ask you this question: Does it matter? I don’t think it does, I see it as a way to train your subconscious.

Practice what I preach

When six and a half years ago I moved to Spain, I immersed myself in Spanish. Radio, television, work, even my flatmates, who native Spanish speakers, I was surrounded by as much Spanish as possible. Naturally, easy to do so when living in the country, I’ll get back to that.

My Spanish is now on a good level and I turned back to (to return to) my English bubble. I watch YouTube videos, almost exclusively, in English, I listen to BBC World Service in the morning while I read my LinkedIn, paying attention to the latter (the last). I read mostly English newspapers and articles. Spanish is the language I speak with friends and my wife.

The miracle answer?

It is necessary, to be honest, having the radio in the background is not THE solution to all your struggles (problems), of course not. In two weeks becoming fluent is difficult, but then again, that is not the goals, it is to maintain the level you have and this homework helps.

 

I hope this article helps you a bit and I wish you good luck with your listening. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our monthly newsletter following this link.

Adjectived -ED or -ING

Éste artículo está conectado con el vídeo que publicamos hoy.

Los ejercicios puedes encontrar aquí.

Adjectives

Los adjetivos en inglés tienen su punto. El uso es igual que en el español pero hay dos tipos que encontramos como más difíciles: los que terminan con ED e ING. Si, fácil no es para nada.

Primero, ¿para qué usamos los adjectives? Pues, dicen algo en un noun. Y más importante, ¡lo ponemos antes del noun!

Adjetivos -ED

Los adjectives que terminan en ED se usa en dos situaciones. Hablamos de:

  • Situaciones temporales o;
  • Emociones.

Adjetivos -ING

Luego los adjectives que finalizan con ING sólo se usa en una situación:

  • Carácter

Vídeo

Para recibir una explicación más extensa, aquí el vídeo de nuestro canal de YouTube.

https://youtu.be/-kcBuCRAulg

Fluidez o perfección: Una anécdota (en inglés)

This is a story of a student of mine who made an interesting choice during a class during which we were talking about dogs. I think it’s a great example of how sometimes you have to chose fluency over perfection and because of that achieving communication, without having the right words. I love this example of resourcefulness and resolve.

The Dog Speaks

When talking about dogs during a class, one my students wanted express that his dog sometimes “barks” loudly. The thing is, at the moment didn’t know that word. Now this is a problem when you want to talk about how different races of dogs bark. On top of that, every language has its own word for barking. So instead of using Spanish in the hope I would understand him, he said “dogs speaks”. My first reaction, I am after all human, was to smile at him, because it was funny. But, my amazement and amusement became even greater when I realized what he had done. He has indirectly asked me for the word in English, without losing fluency, confidence nor composure. Also, he expressed what he wanted to say. Within an English class and in English, these may be two of the most important things combined in one.

Fluency is important, always. When looking up information on the topic you are sure to find many articles that say that, being fluent is more important than being perfect.

What I find even more interesting is that the student in this particular example didn’t mind his own lack of knowledge of the English language. He worked his way around it, set his fear aside and was able to express what he wanted to say. I understood exactly what he wanted to say and so did all the other students in the group. His mission was accomplished, and I repeat, without losing fluency.

Anyone who wants to learn a language can take this example and try it. Believe me, if you can take humiliation, and it’s not going to be a big, you will continue this and learn the language a lot quicker. Good luck, and good one on my student.

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