Etiqueta: Aprender inglés

Welcome a Golfer at your Club Correctly

First impressions are the most important we can make because they are the first (duh) and they stay with the people we meet quite a bit. Therefore, the correct use of language is key. In this article, I will explain some basic things that are essential for the purpose of welcoming guests.

Guests

Respect for the people who visit your course is shown in the way you speak about them, the way you refer to the. As golf is part of the hospitality sector, we prefer to speak about guests instead of clients. The difference? A guest will stay at our facility and will receive a service in the form of hospitality, similar to a restaurant or a hotel. Clients buy products or services.

Referring to the people who visit your resort as guests changes the mindset and the approach.

The Correct Greeting

As mentioned before, greeting our guest is a key part of making a good first impression. This also means that you need to use the correct greeting. And here it is important to remember that the parts of the day may be different in English than they are in your language. So, good morning is valid after a certain hour, especially not as late as in Spain.

  • From 0:00 midnight to 12:00 midday (noon) we say “morning”;
  • From noon to 18:00 we say “afternoon”. Here it is interesting to mention that “afternoon” actually means “after noon“;
  • The last one from 18:00 to 24:00 midnight, we say “evening”.

These different parts of the day also turn into their respective greetings combined with “good”. Meaning that before 12:00 we say “good morning” to people and after this, until 18:00 you say “good afternoon”. The last one would be “good evening”. Be aware to never say “good night” as we say this when we go to bed.

Learn More

If you wish to learn more, you can do so in our eBook, English for Caddie Masters which is available on Amazon.

 

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

Speaking Politely en inglés

Todos sabemos que los ingleses son famosos por sus formas de hablar, educado, poco directo y muchas veces no dicen lo que der verdad quieren decir. Quizás a veces parece increíble. Sin embargo, es bueno saber como hacerlo.

Ahora, voy a ser honesto, al escribir éste artículo no estaba muy seguro que si me iba a fijar en formas o lenguaje. En realidad he decidido hacer las dos cosas. No es por nada que en inglés se dice “manners maketh man” (los modales hacen al hombre) sabiendo muy bien que el lenguaje es parte de ello.

1. Sé menos directo

¿Vaya ironía verdad? Yo le digo que debe ser menos directo y se lo digo así, de forma directa. Algo raro es, pero eso no quita que en inglés hablamos de forma indirecta.

Quizás alguna vez ha escuchado de las directindirect questions:

En vez de decir: Where is the driving range?
Decir: Could you tell me where the driving range is?

En vez de decir: Can I change my tee time to three o’clock?
Decir: It is possible to change my tee time to three o’clock?

Los modal verbs tienen un papel importante en esto. Con por ejemplo can o could se pregunta por posibilidades.

Luego es importante no exigir sino pedir. En nuestro artículo sobre el uso de want referimos a este tema. 

2. Please, thank you, excuse me

Parece obvio, ¿pero cuantas veces lo olvidamos? En inglés se usa mucho, incluso que he leído artículos de españoles en el Reino Unido que dicen que exageran. Puede ser, sin embargo son palabras elegantes. Ah, y por favor, di excuse me antes de empujar a una persona, en caso contrario pierde su efecto por completo.

Casi olvido que you’re welcome es un muy buena respuesta cuando alguien le dice thank you.

3. Sé positivo, evita palabras negativas

¿Palabras negativas? Si, palabras negativas. Palabras que hacen que una frase suena negativa. Baduncontrolleddreadfull y así podría seguir mucho tiempo. Y sí, es mejor evitar este tipo de palabra y hacer que la frase que está diciendo tiene un tono positivo. Entonces:

En vez de decir: that was a bad shot
Decir: That was not such a good shot

En vez de decir: your golf pants look terrible
Decir: You could have chosen a better pair of pants

4. Toma la culpa

Evita decir you, sobre todo en una discusión. Puede ser que le problema que tiene es causado por otra persona, pero no lo dice. En su lenguaje, el problema lo tiene usted. Esto, por cierto, no sólo le servirá en inglés, también es una buena técnica si tiene que debatir un tema en castellano. 

En vez de decirYou are very expensive.
Decir: We were looking for a lower price.

En vez de decirYou did badly.
Decir: I expected more of you.

5. Tacos son para comer, no para decir

Con antelación tengo que pedir perdón. ¿Por qué? Porque este tema es una gran frustración mía en España. DEJAD DE USAR LOS TACOS (EN INGLÉS). Está tan mal visto en inglés que ya tenemos y usamos apodos para palabras de este tipo. The f-word por ejemplo: Mum, he said the f-word es una frase que se escucha decir a los niños. Entendemos que a veces tiene que soltar algo, por ejemplo cuando el segundo PRO-V seguido va al lago, pero incluso entonces, lo susura.

 

Espero que este artículo le ayuda y le deseo todo lo mejor. Hasta el siguiente artículo:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

Si desee más información sobre nosotros y nuestras clases, aquí lo encontrará

Practice Your English – What Makes a Great Golf Course

At TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback.

What Makes a Great Golf Course

A few weeks ago, Mark Crossfield published an interesting video that we, at TJ English Golf, like quite a lot. In this video he asks the question, “What makes a great golf course”. So we would like to ask you the same question: In your opinion, what makes a great golf course? So we would like to invite you to watch his video, answer some questions and give us your opinion, in writing.

Listening and Questions

The questions are based on Mark Crossfield’s video that you can find by clicking here. The answers you may find at the bottom of the article.

  • What do all four degree on ?
  • What does Dan (white Titlist hat) think about location?
  • What does Mark (the one holding the camera) say about rewarding courses?

Your Ideas

Now you have watched the video, what do you think. What do you think makes a great golf course. Is it the greens, is it the layout? We’d like to know what you think.

Send us an email explaining in about 250 words your ideas on the questions above. Send it to info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject “Practice Your English – Golf Course” and we will respond as soon as possible with feedback on your writing.

Answers

  • All four agree on greens
  • Dan enjoys great views and relaxing in the evening.
  • He hates courses where good shots are not rewarded.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “The Shot Clock Open”, please click here.

Practice Your English – Shot Clock

Photo by Veri Ivanova on Unsplash

At TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback. The level of this class C1.

The Shot Clock

Slow play is becoming an important discussion in golf recently. It frustrates players and even the professionals. So, what can be done about it. Well, The European Tour is now experimenting with solutions and one of those is the shot clock. Players have 40 seconds to make their shot, if they don’t, an extra stroke is added to their total.

In amateur golf the discussion is hot as well. I myself always try to keep up the pace but, since I have a low handicap, I might not be the fastest player myself. I am aware of this and I’m working on it.

Reading and Questions

The questions are based on an article that you can find by clicking here. The answers you may find at the bottom of this article.

  • Describe the reviews that were given (please, don’t just copy)
  • How was the shot clock enforced during the tournament?
  • What was an unexpected extra result of the shot clock?
  • Explain the reactions of the American players
  • Did players actually use all the time needed?

Your Ideas

So, as mentioned, slow play is a topic that is being discussed. I would like your opinion on the topic now. Do you encounter it on the course, do you think the pros should set the example by not playing slow? Are you maybe even a slow player.

Send us an email explaining in about 150 words your ideas on the questions above. Send it to info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject “Practice Your English – Shot Clock” and we will respond as soon as possible with feedback on your writing.

Answers

  • Rave reviews meaning extremely enthusiastic
  • Players would receive a penalty shot if passing the 40 seconds
  • Scores actually went down compared to last year.
  • Your own answers
  • No, they didn’t. Often they hit the ball before the clock hit 30 seconds.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “The Home of Golf”, please click here.

I’m Too Tired

Photo by Massimo Sartirana on Unsplash

As an English teacher, I love the interaction with you, my students, on a weekly basis. It gives me energy and, I have to be honest, pleasure.

What I probably shouldn’t tell you, but I will anyway, is that I love to watch you struggle: finding the right words, the right structure, but mostly, the psychological and physical aspects of your fight. This is because I believe these may be the most difficult to overcome. Especially at the beginning.

Here are two “complaints” I especially love, because they are so common and they even happened to me.

I’m Too Tired

You are tired during class, yup, it happened to us all. Speaking a different language takes energy; speaking a foreign language for an extended period takes a lot of energy. How do I know? I live in Spain and I am a foreigner. I love it when people ask me: “have you no idea how difficult it is to speak English for so long time?” (Mistake is on purpose). My response? “What do you think.” and no, it’s not a question, it’s a confirmation. I live in a country that is not mine, where I don’t speak any of my native languages, so… “Yes, but you speak perfect Spanish, it’s easy for you.” This is a typical response many give to many similar topics. And let’s be clear, I did not wake up one morning and speak Spanish like this.

The bottom line is that it is normal to be tired. It doesn’t matter how much you speak the language you’re learning. I have called my mother often enough complaining about not wanting to speak any more Spanish. I even called and realise I didn’t want to speak any language. I had my moments during business meetings where my brain just stopped working and I had to stop, and I’ve seen this happen to other people as well. They are just saturated.

Here’s another cliche for you: it’s not easy, but anything worth doing is not easy. It takes time and you will build up your stamina. You don’t expect to break 100 (golf related) without any practice do you?

Estoy Espeso

I know, you’re not able to find the words you want to use. But also here, I will need to employ some cliches: you will not speak English like me in 5 minutes. Practice, practice and more importantly: practice. “Ya, pero, es que no me salen las palabras”. Of course, and that is completely normal. If you don’t use your car for some months, it will also have some problems starting up. Would you expect anything else from your car? Then why do you expect that from your English.

Language doesn’t only need practice, it also needs maintenance. It will get rusty (yes, we say the same thing in English) if you don’t use it for a longer time and then, you need to find the words again, even if, probably, you understand everything you hear around you. Again, I have the same experiences. Sometimes it is not easy for me to find the words I would like to use and, frankly, my German is a disaster. But then again, I haven’t used it in ages.

There is, however, another skill that you need to be able to use in these situations, which is to go around these words. Being able to explain what you want to say, without loosing too much of your fluency.

This article is not based on scientific evidence, it is based on my experience as a language learner and teacher.

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our newsletter following this link.

Practice You English – Open de España

Open de España John Rahm

Picture from elpais.com

At TJ English Golf we believe in the cliché of “practice makes perfect“. Therefore, every once in a while, we ask you to do some exercises and we will give you feedback. The level of this class B2/C1.

 

The Open de España

More than a week has past since John Rahm won the Open de España in a magnificent manner. Everyone on the golf world, in Spain, spoke about the tournament while it was being played and I know many who went to the golf course. A shame I was busy playing golf my self (yes, I am being sarcastic).

I thought you would enjoy some exercises about the Open de España.

Reading and Questions

The questions below are based on the article by ThoughtCo which you may find by clicking here. The answers can be found at the bottom of the article.

  • The runner-up was Paule Dunne, therefore, his final position was?
  • What is the oldest record set for the tournament, as mentioned in the article?
  • Why is Antonio Garrido the first winner in the European Tour’s history?
  • Why was Miguel Angel Jimenez’s victory in 2014 important?

Your Opinion

As mentioned at the beginning of the article, many we excited about the tournament being played, especially that is was so close to Madrid. Did you go? And what’s next?
Write us your ideas in about 100 words and send them to us at info@tjenglishgolf.es with the subject line “Practice your English – Open de España” and we will respond as soon as possible.

 

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our monthly newsletter following this link.

Answers

  • He was second. The second position is called “runner-up”.
  • The golfer with the most wins, Angel de la Torre.
  • Because the Spanish Open was the first ever European Tour tournament played, and he won, in 1972.
  • He was 50 years old, setting a record for the older ever European Tour winner and being the first to do so in his 50’s.

If you would like to have a look at the previous exercises on “The New Rules of Golf”, please click here.

Abbreviations

 In this blog, and video, we will talk about abbreviations which we may find at work.

ASAP

As soon as possible. This means that things need to get done as soon as possible.
How to use it: Get it done ASAP!

N/A

Not applicable. I have very little to add actually.
How to use it: Do you have an example sentence? N/A.

FYI

For your information. We use this to inform people on something.
How to use it: FYI, I made the putt.

BTW

By the way. I would use this when I would like to add some information or digress for a moment.
How to use it: BTW, I scored PAR.

EOD

End of day. You can use this when you need to refer to something at the end of the (working) day, maybe something needs to be done by then.
I will send you the quotation before EOD.

COB

Closing of business. Similar to EOD and used in the same way as well.

COD

Cash on delivery. This is used in regard to financial transactions. The payment will be made when the delivery of the ordered goods has been made.
How to use it: We can wait with the payment, it’s COD.

TBD

To be decided. You need to think a little bit about what you want to do with the issue at hand. I use it on my website as well.
How to use it: Golf course for the next Special, TBD.

RSVP

Réspondez S’il Vous Plaît. It’s actually French, as you may have noticed.It means, please respond. Typically you will find this on invitations to events and it is correct to actually respond.
How to use it: If you want to participate in the tournament, RSVP.

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our newsletter following this link.

5 Tips to Improve Your Fluency

When learning a new language, we try to be perfect. Perfection however is the biggest enemy of fluency and to make sure you can finish the point you want to make, you need to be fluent, not perfect.

Of course, as always, you can also watch the YouTube video we made by clicking here.

Use the words you know

Using words you know, means using words that are readily available. Maybe at the end of a sentence you can use a word you have recently heard, after an elongated uhm.

Use a word or phrase from your own language

Sometimes it is difficult to come up with a word that you have just learnt, you know you know it but can’t remember. Say the word in your own language and then try to explain it to the other person. It will keep your speech going while finishing your statement.

Related to number 2, talk your way around an unknown word

You don’t know how to say something? Explain it straight away, the worst thing that could happen is that the other person interrupts you by saying the word you are looking to use, they will want to help you without actually taking your “turn” away from you.

Don’t study grammar too much

Grammar is important, but the objective is to communicate your message. Also, keep in mind, we are not talking about writing here, where grammar matters a lot more and where you have more time to think about what you want to put on paper. We are speaking about speaking.

Don’t be afraid of mistakes

Connected to number 4. Mistakes are part of speaking. We all make them and they are part of speaking. Naturally, you should try to root the mistakes out as much as you can and you will, over time. Don’t let a silly mistake, that didn’t change your message, ruin the whole delivery of that same message.

Conclusion

After having said all this, I would like you to keep in mind that there should be a balance. You enlarge your vocabulary, you use it more fluently, as a result, you enlarge vocabulary and improve grammar and you improve fluency and so on and so forth. You see where I’m going with this I hope.

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

My Morning Routine

On many websites I have read that it is good to have a morning routine. Many of them are, of course, lifestyle websites and channels on YouTube.

I believe in having a routine as well. Now, if you look to explain it to someone, then you, naturally, need the vocabulary to do so.

If you’d like to watch the video we made on the topic, we invite you to click here.

We have included the topic of “having/taking a shower”, as well as “wake up/ get up”, just to make it interesting.

Being Polite, Want and Must

The verbs “want” and “must”. Two verbs that I hear around my classes with a high frequency.  They can be quite strong however to use, impolite even. And so, any alternatives?

In this video we talk about this topic and give you some ideas to use instead.

I hope this helps you a bit and I wish you good luck. Until the next article:

DON’T FORGET TO PRACTICE

If you would like to receive more information about us, please send me an email to info@tjenglishgolf.es

You can also sign up for our monthly newsletter following this link.

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